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COURSES OFFERED TO OTHER DEPARTMENTS

 HISTORY COURSES OFFERED TO OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Courses that are marked with an asterisk (*) are offered by the staff at special hours (different from the teaching programme of the Faculty of History & Archaeology).

Whenever a course is not offered in special hours, students from other departments are advised to declare their participation to the teachers at the beginning of the courses, independently from the dates for official selection declarations submitted to their corresponding departmental secretaries. In this case, maximum number of students is 150 per course (priority list). 

For the FACULTY OF PHILOLOGY (between brackets the course code as offered by the Faculty of Philology):

DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS

Compulsory

  • ΙΙ 10ΑΤ (ΚΙΙ01) Ancient Greek History Α* (winter semester)

Ancient Greek History from the beginnings to the end of the Classical period. In this course, the main political events as well as the political, social and economic characteristics of the individual periods of Ancient Greek history are presented.

E. Psoma, 3 hours

  • ΙΙ 11ΑΤ (ΚΙΙ02) Αncient History B*     (winter semester)

The Hellenistic and Roman World (from Alexander to Diocletian)

  1. Part A: political events, social, economic and religious phenomena of the Hellenistic period (336-30 BC).
  2. Part B: political events, social, economic and religious phenomena of the Roman  imperial period (from August to Diocletian).

S. Aneziri, 3 hours

Optional (limited selection)

  • ΙΙ 89 Αncient History (spring semester)

Introduction to Ancient Greek Epigraphy

S. Aneziri, 3 hours

  • II13AT (KII03) Βyzantine History*  (spring semester)

Introduction to Byzantine History 

S. Mergiali-Sahas, 3 hours

  • KΙΙ04 Early Modern and Modern Greek History / Topics in Greek History, 15th-20th c.* (winter semester)

The course examines the major political, social and economic developments in the Greek lands under Ottoman and Venetian rule from the fall of Constantinople (1453) until the entry of Greece into the Second World War (1940). Institutions of the Ottoman Empire pertaining to its Orthodox population will be highlighted. The political ideas of the Greek Enlightenment (eighteenth century) and the establishment of the Greek nation-state in 1821 will also be read. The political, institutional and intellectual history of Modern Greece in the nineteenth and the early twentieth century will be overviewed.

Sp. Ploumidis, 3 hours 

DEPARTMENT OF BYZANTINE LITERATURE AND FOLKLORE

Compulsory

  • II13AT (MΙΙ03) Βyzantine History*      (spring semester)

Introduction to Byzantine History

S. Mergiali-Sahas, 3 hours

Optional (limited selection)

  • ΙΙ 10Φ (ΜΙΙ01) Ancient Greek History Α* (winter semester)

Ancient Greek History from the beginnings to the end of the Classical period. In this course, the main political events as well as the political, social and economic characteristics of the individual periods of Ancient Greek history are presented.

E. Psoma, 3 hours 

  • ΙΙ 11ΑΤ (MΙΙ02) Αncient History B      (winter semester)

The Hellenistic and Roman World (from Alexander to Diocletian)

  1. Part A: political events, social, economic and religious phenomena of the Hellenistic period (336-30 BC).
  2. Part B: political events, social, economic and religious phenomena of the Roman  imperial period (from August to Diocletian).

S. Aneziri, 3 hours

  • ΙΙ 89 Αncient History (spring semester)

Introduction to Ancient Greek Epigraphy

S. Aneziri, 3 hours

  • ΜΙΙ04  (winter semester)

Early Modern and Modern Greek History / Topics in Greek History, 15th-20th c.*                      

S. Ploumidis, 3 hours

DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS

Optional (limited selection)

  • ΙΙ 10Φ (ΓΙΙ01) Ancient Greek History Α* (winter semester)

Ancient Greek History from the beginnings to the end of the Classical period. In this course, the main political events as well as the political, social and economic characteristics of the individual periods of Ancient Greek history are presented.

E. Psoma, 3 hours

  • ΙΙ 11ΑΤ (ΓΙΙ02) Αncient History B      (winter semester)

The Hellenistic and Roman World (from Alexander to Diocletian)

  1. Part A: political events, social, economic and religious phenomena of the Hellenistic period (336-30 BC).
  2. Part B: political events, social, economic and religious phenomena of the Roman  imperial period (from August to Diocletian).

S. Aneziri, 3 hours

  • ΙΙ 89 Αncient History  (spring semester)

Introduction to Ancient Greek Epigraphy

S. Aneziri, 3 hours

  • II13AT (ΓΙΙ03) Βyzantine History*     (spring semester)

Introduction to Byzantine History 

S. Mergiali -Sahas, 3 hours

  • ΓΙΙ04  (winter semester)

Early Modern and Modern Greek History / Topics in Greek History, 15th-20th c.*                      

S. Ploumidis, 3 hours

For the DEPARTMENT OF ΕDUCATIONAL STUDIES

Compulsory

  • 74ΙΙ10ΑΤ Αncient History* (spring semester)

Ancient Greek History from the beginning until the Roman Imperial period  

N. Giannakopoulos, 3 hours

  • 74ΙΙ13ΑΤ Βyzantine History* (spring semester)

Introduction to Byzantine History 

S. Mergiali-Sahas, 3 hours

  • ΙΙ 88 Contemporary Greek Political History     (winter semester)

The Greek Political System, 1929-1967

Ε. Hatzivassiliou, 3 hours

Optional 

  • ΙΙ 30 Early Modern Greek History II    (spring semester)

History of the Greek territories under Venetian rule (13th-18th c.)

K. Konstantinidou, 3 hours

  • ΙΙ 84 History of the Post-WW2 World    (spring semester)

Ε. Κoumas, 3 hours

For the DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

Compulsory

  • 73ΙΣΤ001 Αncient History*                 (spring semester)

Ancient Greek History from the beginning until the Roman Imperial period

N. Giannakopoulos, 3 hours

  • 73ΙΣΤ101 Βyzantine History*   (spring semester)

Introduction to Byzantine History 

S. Mergiali-Sahas, 3 hours

  • ΙΥ 20 Early Modern and Modern Greek History / Topics in Greek history, 15th-20th c.*  (winter semester)

K. Konstantinidou, 3 hours

Optional

  • ΙΙ 30 Early Modern Greek History II          (spring semester)

History of the Greek territories under Venetian rule (13th-18th c.)

K. Konstantinidou, 3 hours

  • ΙΙ 88 Contemporary Greek Political History     (winter semester)

The Greek Political System, 1929-1967

Ε. Hatzivassiliou, 3 hours

  • ΙΙ 84 History of the Post-WW2 World   (spring semester)

Ε. Koumas, 3 hours

For the DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

 Optional

  •  67ΙΙ 10ΑΤ Αncient History*         (spring semester)

Ancient Greek History from the beginning until the Roman Imperial period

N. Giannakopoulos, 3 hours

  • 67ΙΙ 13ΑΤ Introduction to Byzantine History  *      (spring semester)

S. Mergiali-Sahas, 3 hours

  •  ΙΙ 30 Early Modern Greek History B  (spring semester)

History of the Greek territories under Venetian rule (13th-18th c.)

K. Konstantinidou, 3 hours

  • ΙΥ 20 Early Modern and Modern Greek History / Topics in Greek history, 15th-20th c.*  (winter semester)

K. Konstantinidou, 3 hours

  • ΙΙ 88 Contemporary Greek Political History     (winter semester)

The Greek Political System, 1929-1967

Ε. Hatzivassiliou, 3 hours

  • ΙΙ 84 History of the Post-WW2 World        (spring semester)

Ε. Koumas, 3 hours

For the FACULTY OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

 Optional 

  • ΕEI01 Early Modern and Modern Greek History / Topics in Greek history, 15th-20th c.*         (winter semester)

K. Konstantinidou, 3 hours

For the FACULTY OF FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

Optional

  •  64679 Early Modern and Modern Greek History / Topics in Greek history, 15th-20th c.*            (winter semester)

K. Konstantinidou, 3 hours

For the FACULTY OF GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

 Optional

  •  ΙΥ 20 Early Modern and Modern Greek History / Topics in Greek history, 15th-20th c.*  (winter semester)

K. Konstantinidou, 3 hours

  •  ΙΙ 13ΑΤ Βyzantine History* (spring semester)

Introduction to Byzantine History 

S. Mergiali-Sahas, 3 hours

  •  ΙΙ 30 Early Modern Greek History B  (spring semester)

History of the Greek territories under Venetian rule (13th-18th c.)

K. Konstantinidou, 3 hours

  •  ΙΙ 88 Contemporary Greek Political History     (winter semester)

The Greek Political System, 1929-1967

Ε. Hatzivassiliou, 3 hours

  •  ΙΙ 84 History of the Post-WW2 World        (spring semester)

Ε. Koumas, 3 hours

For the FACULTY OF SPANISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

Compulsory

  • 72ΚΟΙ 009 Early Modern and Modern Greek History / Topics in Greek history, 15th-20th c.*  (winter semester)

K. Konstantinidou, 3 hours

For the DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATICS AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS

  • ΙΙ 84 History of the Post-WW2 World  (spring semester)

Ε. Koumas, 3 hours

COURSES IN ARCHAEOLOGY AND ART HISTORY OFFERED TO OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Courses noted with an asterisk (*) are offered specifically to the corresponding Faculty.

Whenever a course is not offered in special hours, students from other departments are advised to declare their participation to the teachers at the beginning of the courses, independently from the dates for official selection declarations submitted to their corresponding departmental secretaries. In this case, maximum number of students is 150 per course (priority list).

  1. For the Faculty of Philology

Orientation: Classical Philolog

 2. COURSES IN ARCHAEOLOGY AND ART HISTORY

 WINTER SEMESTER

Α) CORE SUBJECTS

  • ΙΑ 04 Introduction to Archaeology            Introduction to Archaeology

The course deals with the definitions, principles, methods and practice of the discipline of Archaeology. The main methods of discovering, unearthing, recording, dating and studying archaeological remains are also discussed. Other issues include archaeological ethics, heritage management, and the importance of archaeology for the present and future of modern societies. Case studies from greek and world archaeology are also presented to enhance the understanding of the above issues. Bibliography, images and handouts can be downloaded from eclass (ARCH284). Optional visits to museums and archaeological sites.

 e-class: ARCH284 (Bibliography, images and handouts)

Y. Papadatos, 3 hours

  •  ΙΑ 11Classical Archaeology I   Introduction to Greek Archaeology and a brief survey of the Geometric and Archaic Periods (c. 1050-480 BC).

An Introduction to Greek Archaeology and its methodology. A brief survey of the development of architecture, sculpture, metallurgy, pottery and vase painting in mainland Greece and the islands between 1050 and 480 BC, based on the archaeological record.

 e-class: ARCH451 and ARCH514

E. Kefalidou, 3 hours.  

  •  ΙΑ 13 Βyzantine Archaeology I Introduction to Byzantine Archaeology. Early Byzantine period (4th – 7th c. AD)

From the Christian Αrt history of the 19th c. to the interdisciplinary approaches of the 21st c. Study of Vernacular and Ecclesiastical Architecture, Monumental Painting and Minor Arts of the period between the 4th and the 7th century A.D.

Ε-class: ARCH272

P. Petridis, 3 hours

  •  ΙΑ 15 History of Art I   The Art of Renaissance and Mannierism (15th -16th centuries)

Starting with the development of the “Natural Style” and Giotto’s artistic production during the 14th century, Painting, Sculpture and Architecture will be examined in the main Italian artistic centres ( Florence, Rome, Venice)in the 15th and 16th centuries. Emphasis will be put on theoretical texts concerning Renaissance Art, namely on Leon Battista Alberti’s, Della Pittura, Florence 1436, as well as on Leonardo da Vinci’s Trattato della Pittura, Paris 1651.

e-class: ARCH200 (full archive of courses pictures)

Ε. Μavromichali, 3 hours                                 

Β) SPECIALIZATION SUBJECTS

SPECIALIST COURSES

  • ΙΑ 42 Archaeology of the Near East   ΙΑ42 Archaeology of the Near East

This course offers an overview of the history and archaeology of the Near East from the late 3rd to the early 1st mil. B.C. An emphasis is given to Anatolia (Hittite empire, Phrygia, Lydia), the Levant (Canaanite archaeology, Late Hittite, Aramaic, Philistine, Phoenician and Israelite kingdoms, the Assyrian expansion) and Egypt (Middle and New Kingdom). A special discussion will follow about the Egyptian and Hittite texts which refer to the Aegean (Ahhiyawa, Keftiu, Tanaja).

 e-class: ARCH275

K. Κopanias, 3 hours

  • ΙΑ 26 Prehistoric Archaeology III  Prehistoric Archaeology III: Theory of the archaeological discipline: Main trends and schools

The object of the course is the familiarisation with the main directions of archaeological thought, such as Culture History, New or Processual Archaeology, Post Processual Archaeology and the current neo-materialist tendencies. The course also examines the contribution of philosophical traditions, such as positivism, evolutionism and phenomenology, in archaeological research. The course objective is the critical presentation of the theoretical frame, within which any archaeological research is circumscribed. The treatment of theoretical issues is based upon indicative examples mainly but not exclusively from the prehistoric Aegean.

https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/ARCH325/

opencourses.uoa.gr/courses/ARCH12/

G. Vavouranakis, 3 hours

  • ΙΑ 44 Post-Byzantine Archaeology  The Greek world after the Fall of Constantinople: art and archaeology of the 15th to 18th century

The course offers an overview of the material culture and artistic production developed after 1453 in areas with Greek orthodox population and Greek communities living under Latin or Ottoman rule. Urban planning, secular and religious architecture, sculpture and ceramics are among the topics that will be explored. Particular emphasis will be paid to the main trends in religious painting, represented in monumental art and portable icons, as well as to aspects of metalwork and embroideries. Aspects of tradition and renewal in the art of the period will be discussed throughout the course, with reference both to the Palaiologan legacy and the reception and appropriation of western and ottoman artistic expressions.

The lectures will be supplemented by visits to monuments and museums in Athens and Attica.

e-class: ARCH649 and ARCH717

Α. Drandaki, G. Pallis, 3 hours

OPTIONAL COURSES

Α. SEMINARS

  • SA 153 Prehistoric Archaeology Prehistoric chipped stone industries and tools

Prehistoric chipped stone industries and tools is a rather recent subject of archaeological research in Greece. As documents of human activity, lithics constitute a significant category of archaeological material occurring during all periods of Prehistory from Paleolithic times till Late Bronze Age. Lithics are the key for the exploration and understanding of human intelligence, behavior and technical skills. In this course we present the history of the research on lithics since Renaissance, we comment the theoretical and methodological background, and develop the four principal axes of the study: raw material identification and procurement, techniques of production and “chaines opératoires”, typological approach, functional analysis. We stress, finally, the contribution of the experimental archaeology in the comprehension of the production and use of the lithic tools.

The course is enriched by practice on lithic prehistoric collections.  Preparation of a seminar paper.

e-class: ARCH178

G. Kourtesis – Philippakis, 3 hours

  • SΑ 116 Prehistoric Archaeology Minoan religion

The history of the research and the pioneers in the field of the religion in the Aegean Bronze Age. The beginnings of the Minoan religion. The Minoan “pantheon”. Pre-palatial shrines. The cult during the Proto-palatial period. Religious beliefs and practices during the period of the new palaces. Cult places inside and outside the settlements. Ceremonies, religious symbols and cultic equipment. The religion in Crete during the Post-palatial period. Influences and survivals. Concluding remarks.

e-class:: ARCH375 

El. Platon, 3 hours

  • SA 191 Archaeology of the Near East Historic Geography of the Eastern Mediterranean during the Late Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age

This seminar will focus on the Historic Geography of the Eastern Mediterranean during the Late Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age. It will examine the geopolitical conditions in Anatolia, the Levant, Mesopotamia and Egypt, which led to the rise of the Great Kingdoms. It will also focus on the new geopolitical conditions, which prevailed in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Early Iron Age. The participants of the course will create StoryMaps in ArcGIS.

e-class: ARCH795

K. Κopanias, 3 hours

  • SA 183 Byzantine Archaeology  Cities of Greece in the middle and late Byzantine era

The subject of the seminar is the layout and the evolution of the cities of Greece during the middle and late byzantine era, based on written sources and archaeological evidence. Life in byzantine Greece developed through a network of ancient cities with new planning and appearance, which had a great impact on their form till now. Issues such as urban planing, architecture and daily life in these medieval cities will be thoroughly examined. Furthermore, special emphasis will be placed on the methodological tools used in the study of byzantine cities.

Visits to Athens and Thebes.

e-class: ARCH 797

G. Pallis, 3 hours

  • SA 80 History of Art Artists and trends in contemporary art

Definitions, movements, trends and artists of the 20th century (from Fauvism to Land Art).

e-class: ARCH444

D. Pavlopoulos, 3 hours.

  • SA 136 Mouseology Museums in times of crisis: Policies and strategies for their management, best practices

The course draws from contemporary reality as this has been shaped with the necessary closure of museums world-wide due to the pandemic (at an unprecedented rate of 90%) and the explosion of their creativity in the digital space. At first, the course analyses the concept of crisis management in museums and studies different experiences and case studies, triggered either by manmade or natural causes. The core subject matter of the course focuses on the difficulties, challenges, opportunities and best practices that came to the fore with the increased presence of museums in the digital space and takes into account data gathered by a number of national and international museums associations. The conditions under which museums gradually returned to operation, also in their physical space, will be reviewed, together with how these gained experiences intersect with the contemporary questioning about the changing social role of the museum. The students will study numerous museum applications in the Internet and reflect also on the advantages and disadvantages of the new hyper digital role of museums.

e-class: ARCH802.

M. Mouliou, 3 hours

Β. TAUGHT OPTIONALS

  • ΙΑ 72 Prehistoric Archaeology The Insular Aegean in the Early Bronze Age

This course examines the culture of the Aegean islands during the 3rd millenium B.C. Special emphasis is given to the Cyclades, but the neighbouring insular and littoral areas (Northeast Aegean, the coastline of Asia Minor, Attica and Euboea, North Crete) are also examined for a better understanding of the close relations and intense interaction that developed during this period. Bibliography, images and handouts can be downloaded from eclass. Optional visits to museums and archaeological sites.

e-class: ARCH170 (Bibliography, images and handouts)

Y. Papadatos, 3 hours

  • IA 74 Prehistoric Archaeology The Prehistory of Cyprus.

The development of the early societies of the island, that is of the neolithic and chalcolithic periods, are briefly examined, while at the same time the connection of the latter with the evolution of the Bronze Age is attempted. Greater emphasis is given to the social phenomena which characterize the Early, Middle and Late Bronze Age. Problems of space organization, productive processes and institutional changes (administration, economy, religion) are analyzed through the study of material culture. The cultural physiognomy of the island is placed within the framework of the important developments which took place in the eastern Mediterranean during this era. The use of new technologies enriches the teaching process. The course is also completed with visits to museum collections with Cypriote antiquities in Athens.

e-class: ARCH132

E. Mantzourani, 3 hours

  • ΙΑ 152 Prehistoric Archaeology  Introduction to Mycenaean Archaeology

Introduction to Mycenaean archaeology: brief presentation of the basic charachteristics of the Mycnaean civilization from the period of the shaft graves through the end of the Bronze Age. Secular architecture (cities, citadels and palaces) as well as funerary architecture, burial practices and the material culture will be presented with aim the reconstruction of non material aspects, such as religio, ideology anf socio-political organization of the Mycenaean world.

Adjunct lecturer, 3 hours

  • IA 43 Specialist Courses in Archaeology and Art History  I. Great Greek Sanctuaries.

A survey of the great Greek sanctuaries (Olympia, Delphi, Delos, Epidauros) in relationship with the historical landscape and with emphasis on architecture. Examination of site development, function and space organization, along with typology of propyla, stoas and altars. The evolution of local architectural workshops in combination with the dominant trends and the narrative of the sanctuaries. The movement of architectural workshops within the Greek Mainland.

eclass: ARCH702

C. Kanellopoulos, 3 hours

II.  Art and Technology in Byzantium

The course offers an overview of the history of art and material culture of Byzantium (4th to 15th C.) exploring the materiality of the artworks and the interrelation between artistic expression, raw materials, and technological achievements. Panel paintings, ivories, textiles, metalwork, and jewellery will be examined focusing on their technical features and the expertise of the workshops that produced them, and testimonies to exchanges between Byzantium, Latin West and the Islamic world. Special emphasis will be given to the role of artefacts in Byzantium’s economy, trade and diplomacy. The course will be supplemented by visits to museum galleries and hands-on examination of works of art.

The course will be supported by the Benaki Museum Conservation Department.

eclass: ARCH700

A. Drandaki, 3 hours

ΙΙΙ. Modern Greek sculpture (19th century)

Modern Greek sculpture is examined in relation to European sculpture. During the course, visits / guided tours to exhibitions and workshops will be organized. Written papers are optional.

D. Pavlopoulos, 3 hours              

  • ΙΑ 146 Byzantine Archaeology Εarly Byzantine Pottery

Study of the ceramic artefacts, the production technology, the organization of the workshops and the distribution of the Byzantine pottery. Emphasis will be given to Mediterranean productions of the Early Byzantine period. The historical, economic and social dimension of the pottery will also be investigated.

E-Class: ARCH466

P. Petridis, 3 hours

  • ΙΑ 106 Μuseology  Introduction to Museology

This course aims to introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of Museology, which studies the history and theory of museums and collections. It seeks answers for an array of key questions: how do we define key concepts of Museology such as museum, museum object, and collection? Why do museums exist and which challenges do they currently face? Which is the code of ethics and the institutional framework for their operation in Greece and abroad? How are they categorised in different types? What is the history of museums? How do museums relate to their visitors and society at large? Teaching is based on critical thinking and debating, creative exercises related to museum theory and practice and targeted museum visits.

e-Class: ARCH442

Μ. Μouliou, 3 hours

SPRING SEMESTER

Α) CORE SUBJECTS

  • IA 02 Prehistoric Archaeology I  The civilizations of Prehistoric Aegean. General overview

The course presents the civilizations that flourished in the Aegean during the Stone Age and the Bronze Age. It examines the most important categories of the material culture: habitation and funerary architecture, pottery,  tools, figurines, small objects. It discusses burial habits and matters of ideology and of economic and social organization.

e-class: ARCH 166 (texts, power points and bibliography)

A. Hassiacou – Argyraki, 3 hours                          

  • ΙΑ 10 Prehistoric Archaeology II  Minoan Archaeology

All the periods of the Minoan civilization’s development will be studied. Special emphasis will be given to the development of the various arts (ceramic art, stone vase making, faience working, wall painting etc) from the Prepalatial to the Final Palatial Period.

E-class: ARCH146 & ARCH173

E. Mantzourani, 3 hours (for students whose surname starts with “A – Mα”)

El. Platon, 3 hours (for students whose surname starts with “Με – Ω”)

  • ΙΑ 12 Classical Archaeology II  Archaeology of the Classical and Hellenistic Periods (480 B.C. – 1st century B.C.

The subject of the course is the concise, comprehensive view of the Archaeology of the period from the Persian Wars to the submission of the last Hellenistic kingdom, that of the Ptolemaic Egypt, to the domination of Rome in 30 B.C. Emphasis is placed on architecture and, as well as on pottery, especially of the classical period, painting and mosaics. The stages of evolution and the main artists are examined within the historical and social context of each era. Research problems and further study issues are identified. The course includes visits to archaeological sites and museums (Acropolis, Acropolis Museum and National Archaeological Museum. An optional, practical training in the Conservation Laboratory and the Museum of Cast of the Department is also offered by conservator M. Roggenbucke and sculptor L. Arachovitis.

e-class: ARCH410

St. Katakis, 3 hours              

  • ΙΑ 14 Βyzantine Archaeology II Art and Archaeology of the Middle and Late Byzantine period (7th to 15th centuries)

General survey of the art and archaeology of Byzantium from the 7th century up to the Fall of Constantinople to the Ottomans, in 1453. The course offers an overview of the architecture, painting and material remains of the period, focusing primarily on urban planning, secular and church architecture, sculpture and painting in its various manifestations (monumental art, portable icons, illuminated manuscripts). Presentation of fundamental methodological approaches and analytical tools that apply to the study Byzantium’s diverse artistic expressions, offering dating and classification criteria. The course will be supplemented by visits to Byzantine monuments and Museums in Attica and the Peloponnese.

e-class: ARCH603 and ARCH741

G. Pallis, A. Drandaki, 3 hours.

  • ΙΑ 16 History of Art  II

Baroque art and Rococo art. Painting, Sculpture, Architecture. Differentiations, local schools, the creators in Europe (Italy, Spain, Frnce, Germany, Netherlands, Holland, United Kingdom).

η-Τάξη: ARCH333

D. Pavlopoulos, 3 hours

Β) SPECIALIZATION SUBJECTS

SPECIALIST COURSES

  • ΙΑ 21Τopography – Αrchitecture – Town planning  Monumental topography of Athens during the ancient and early Byzantine times.

A brief introduction to the history of the city, as well as to the history, course and remains of the fortification walls over time. Also, a complete presentation of the archaeological sites and monuments of the Acropolis, the South Slope of the Acropolis, the Ancient and Roman Agora and the Olympieion area. The course includes visits to the sites.

e-class: ARCH682, ARCH358.

P. Petridis, 3 hours

Adjunct lecturer, 3 hours

  • ΙΑ 108 Roman Archaeology  Introduction to the Archaeology of the Roman Period

The subject of this course is the evolution of the arts during the Roman imperial times, from August, i.e. the end of Hellenistic period in 30 B.C., to Constantine the Great and the end of the ancient world. The origins of the arts of this period, both in Italy (Etruscans, Republican Rome) and in the Hellenistic East, will also be examined, as well as Late Antiquity, namely the transition to the Christian world. Furthermore, for a better understanding of the artistic tendencies, we will study the historical and socio-political data of the period. Emphasis will be laid on architecture, sculpture (specially the portrait and the significant groups of statues), painting and pottery. The course includes visits to the National Archaeological Museum and the archaeological sites of the Roman Agora and the Library of Hadrian. In order to be able to meet the demands of the course the student ought to have successfully completed the course IA 12: Classical Archaeology B.

e-class: ARCH274 (bibliography, images and handouts)

St. Κatakis, 3 hours              

  • ΙΑ 31 Classical Archaeology III Greek Monumental Painting

A survey of Greek monumental painting from the Archaic to the Early Imperial Period. Surviving works from the Greek and the Hellenistic world, as well as their reflections on Roman art. Sources and methodology, iconography and subject-matter, developments and breakthroughs, masters and their oeuvres, Greco-Roman aesthetics and criticism.

e-class: ARCH561

Opencourses.uoa.gr/modules/document/index.php?course=ARCH3&openDir=/5412be48wBO1/559fbab0eDNF/55f2abe5Qp2A&sort=name&rev=1

D. Plantzos, 3 hours

  • ΙΑ 103 Excavation and Archaeological Record Processing - Museology Excavation and Archaeological Record Processing – Museology

Subject of this course is archaeological fieldwork, excavation in particular, as well as key principles of archaeological resources management in the museum. The main concepts and methods examined include archaeological context, archaeological site, stratigraphy, documentation of excavation data. Also, the course deals with basic principles of (a) archaeological conservation and first aid on site, (b) post-excavation study and processing of archaeological finds, and (c) archaeological finds exhibition and museology. The course includes:

  1. training in excavation techniques at the departmental excavation at Plasi Marathon
  2. practicals in sorting and recording ancient pottery at the Museum of Archaeology and History of Art
  3. practicals in conservation of archaeological finds in the field and the laboratory
  4. educational activities for school groups, with archaeology students (a selected number of them from this course) acting as facilitators and interpreters Practical lessons are offered by Dr. Alexandra Sfyroera (archaeologist) and Michel Roggenbucke (conservator) Optional visits to museums and archaeological sites. Bibliography, images and handouts can be downloaded from eclass: ARCH492.

Y. Papadatos, A. Hassiacou- Argyraki, G. Vavouranakis, M. Mouliou, 3 hours.

  • ΙΑ 29 History of Art III  Εuropean Art from Neoclassicism to Art Nouveau (18th -19th cent.)

The artistic movements and trends of the 18th and 19th centuries will be examined: neoclassicism, romanticism, realism, impressionism, post-impressionistic tendencies, symbolism, Art Nouveau. The factors which defined the special characteristics of each movement will be analysed within the general framework of an epoch the main features of which were the industrial revolution and the development of sciences. Emphasis will be put on the theory of art of the period 1880-1900 know as le fin de siècle.

η-Tάξη: ARCH149 (full archive of the courses pictures)

Ε. Μavromichali, 3 hours

OPTIONAL COURSES

Α. SEMINARS

  • SΑ 111 Prehistoric Archaeology Critical (re-) interpretation of prehistoric burial data

Burial assemblages are treated in various ways by archaeological research: e.g., as sealed contexts and thus significant for the typology of artifacts and their dating, as indicative of the identity and social status of the dead, as sources of information about the biological characteristics of past people, as examples of metaphysical beliefs, and, more generally, collective notions about the world and the function of society. The seminar is divided into two parts. The first part discusses the main theoretical and interpretative directions of research. In the second part, students are called to apply the above directions by re-interpreting the finds from a prehistoric cemetery of their choice. Compulsory series of short written essays and their oral presentation.

e-class: ARCH324

G. Vavouranakis, 3 hours

  • SΑ 22 Prehistoric Archaeology Minoan Pottery: Typological Development and Decorative Styles.

Introduction: the significance of the pottery in the study of ancient civilizations. The technological issues. Discussion on the use of the various pottery types. The chronological systems for studying Bronze Age Crete. Definition of the principal questions related to the dating of various pottery assemblages. Technology, typology and decorative styles for each period: Pre-palatial period; Proto-palatial period. Neo-palatial period; Post-palatial period. Concluding remarks.

e-class: ARCH356

El. Platon, 3 hours

  • SΑ154 Prehistoric Archaeology Mycenaean art

The seminar examines the entire spectrum of Mycenaean art and technology, pottery, wall frescoes and small artefacts (seals, jewelry and figurines) as well as their importance towards understanding Mycnaean society. The students submit essays within the frame of the seminar’s topics.

Adjunct lecturer, 3 hours

  • SA13 Archaeology of the Near East Burial customs and the beliefs about the Netherworld in the Eastern Meditteranean during the Late Bronze and Early Iron Age

This course focuses on the burial practices in the wider area of the Eastern Mediterranean (Anatolia, Levant, Egypt). The archaeological testimonia will be combined with the available Near Eastern texts, including the Mesopotamian ones, which help us to reconstruct the beliefs about the Underworld and the Afterlife.

 e-class: ARCH351.

K. Kopanias, 3 hours

  • SΑ 88 Classical Archaeology Studying classical art: theory and method

This seminar offers a systematic and thorough survey of the methodological tools necessary for the study of classical Greek and Roman art. As a branch of classical archaeology, the study of Greek and Roman art demands specialized historical and art-historical tools, as well as synergies with other disciplines, such as social anthropology, philosophy, psychoanalysis and history of ideas. Using specific examples, the course attempts to clarify issues such as the comprehension, interpretation, enjoyment and teaching of classical art.

e-class: ARCH562

D. Plantzos, 3 hours

  • SA 184 Byzantine Archaeology Byzantine Art between the Islamic world and the crusader states, 12th-15th centuries

With the arrival of the Crusaders in Eastern Mediterranean, the new political and socioeconomic conditions affected every aspect of artistic expression. In different ways and to various degrees, Byzantine metaware, ceramics, manuscript illumination and monumental art responded to these new realities and reflect the constant dialogue between Byzantines, Crusaders and Muslims which was no longer restricted to diplomatic contacts within the walls of the imperial palace. After 1204 and the fourth crusade, the enforced coexistence between Greeks, Latins, and Ottomans fueled not only confrontations and rivalries, but also osmosis clearly reflected in the artistic production and material culture of the period.

e-class: ARCH804

A. Drandaki, 3 hours

  • SΑ 131 Byzantine Archaeology  Constantinople and the Greek cities during the Early Byzantine period

Study of urban development of the capital of the Empire and the cities of the Greek periphery from the foundation of Constantinople to the middle of the 7th c. AD.

e-class: ARCH747

P. Petridis, 3 hours

Β. TAUGHT OPTIONALS

  • ΙΑ 208 Prehistoric Archaeology Aegean Iconography

The Aegean iconography (from Crete, Cyclades and Mainland Greece) is examined through the study of the art of wall painting in  combination with relevant themes from pottery, seal engraving, jewelery, as well as ivory, faience and stone work. The course aims at the analysis and discussion of questions which iconography poses, regarding the perception and interpretation of images but also their meaning for the aegean society at the level of ideology and/or religion.

e-class: ARCH345

Ε. Μantzourani, 3 hours

  • IA151 Prehistoric Archaeology Organization of the Mycenaean palatial states

The Mycenaean palatial states during the 14th and 13th centuries are the subject of the course. The most important palatial centers and their basic characteristics are examined. The course analyses the structure of the Mycenaean society and examines aspects of the admistrative system and economy, on the grounds of archaeological finds and litterary sources, along with issues of iconography, ideology and religion that relate to enforcement of palatial power.

Adjunct lecturer, 3 hours

  • IA 17 Introduction to Art History  Introduction to the Science of Art History

The teaching is of the semantics of the work of art, elements of the technique and materials of its artistic negotiation (painting, sculpture, engraving, mosaic, ceramics, architecture, photography), as well as of the general characteristics of the periods ranging from antiquity to modern times. The course concentrates on important works and artists, with the parallel projection of slides from the History of Art.

e-class: ARCH387

D. Pavlopoulos, 3 hours

  • ΙΑ 64   Classical Archaeology Attic black-figure pottery

The course discusses the construction techniques, shapes, usage, commencial use and iconography of the Athenian back figured pottery, which has produced great quantities and was exported across the Mediterranean. Following chronologically the work of most important painters, the course examines the basic iconographic circles, the methods of painted narrative, as well as the relationship of the paintings with the social and political conditions of the archaic period.   The seminar includes visits to the National Archaeological Museum in Athens (pottery collection) and practical exersice in the Museum of our Dept.

eclass: ARCH418

Ε. Κefalidou, 3 hours

  • ΙΑ 161 Classical Archaeology  Greek Temple Architecure

The course examines the Greek temples and sanctuaries between 700 B.C. through the 1st century B.C. A review of the components of the Greekl sanctuaries and of the evolution of the doric and the ionic orders. The origins, terminology and aesthetics of the three Greek orders are also  analysed. The course discusses the issues of spatial organization in sanctuaries, the importance of the Greek temple’s design aspects and of the decorative details. 

Adjunct lecturer, 3 hours

  • ΙΑ 82 Byzantine Archaeology From sword to firearms. The archaeology of war in the Byzantine and the early Post-Byzantine period

The course focuses on the material evidence of war in the Greek territory, from the beginnings of the confrontation between the Byzantines and the Arabs and Bulgarians, till the conflict between the Venetians and the Ottoman Turks. The topic includes castles and other types of fortifications and their impact on the form of the cities and the landscape, war machines, military equipment and weapons of the Byzantine warriors. The course aims to present the continuity of ancient practices in the warfare, the introduction of new tactics and weapons, as well the radical change that the invention of firearms caused in the fortifications and the war methods. Visits to Athenian museums and monuments of the Peloponnese will take place during the course.

E-class: ARCH 520

G. Pallis, 3 hours.

  • IA 131 History of Art History of Greek Printmaking, 19th-20th c.

It examines the teaching of printmaking in Athens Royal Technical School, in Athens School of Fine Arts, as well as the teachers and the students. Studied printmakers and artists engaged in printmaking, distinguish between the artisan artist and the printmaker, analyzed and displayed prints are held in exhibitions, reference applied the role of printmaking, to show the connection with the art of printing in the 19th c., considered the impact of subjects in social classes and its role in the historical reality. Supplementary visits to relevant art shows in museums and galleries, as well as in modern Greek artists workshops. Optional works.

e-class: ARCH422

D. Pavlopoulos, 3 hours

  • IΑ 190 Museum pedagogy Museum pedagogy. On learning and creativity in museums.

In recent years, museums have distinctive educational and social missions to reach a deep understanding of the world and how quality changes affect peoples’ lives; thus, they take into consideration new theoretical approaches regarding learning and progressive education and implement numerous activities for different target groups (i.e. schools groups).  They have also proved, in Greece and abroad, that compliment well formal education by initiating alternative educational activities and experiences, taking as starting point the requirements provided by the curricula of primary and secondary school.Teaching is based on critical thinking and debating, creative exercises related to museum theory and practice and targeted museum visits.

e-Class: ARCH471

Μ. Μouliou, 3 hours

  • II 89 Ancient Greek History  Introduction to Ancient Greek Epigraphy.

The lesson aims at familiarizing students with interpretative methods in ancient greek epigraphy. Basic categories of greek private and public inscriptions are examined, such as decrees, laws, epistles, edicts, honorary and funeral inscriptions. Epigraphical sources will be approached in close inter-relationship with literary sources and historical events, as well as with questions of topography and of prosopography. The seminar includes visits to the Epigraphical Museum.

e-class: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/ARCH533/

S. Aneziri, 3 hrs.

  • 61Practical training of students Practical training of students

This programme aims at acquainting a large number of our students with the physical locations of their future professional work and to create an interaction between academic education and relevant services. Participation in the programme is voluntary and is carried out in the ephorates of the Archaeological Service, in historical archives, museums, libraries, research centres and in the ministries of culture and education. Participants are engaged for a term of one, two, three or four months.  The programme is funded by the Programme “ESPA” 2014-2020 (funded by the European Union and the Hellenic Republic).

The academic responsibility for the Programme of Practical Training lies with assοciate professor Υ. Papadatos.

OPEN TUTORIALS

  • Α. ArchaeoCosmos. Historical Geography of the Medietrranean and the Near East from the Prehistory through the Late Antiquity. (Winter and spring  semester)

Filing ancient texts and record of archaeological sites in the data base of the program. ArcGIS software will be taught.

e-class: ARCH757

K. Kopanias, 2 hrs

  • Applications in techniques and materials of sculpture (Winter and spring semester)

Artistic forms' functions and their relation to human activities – Media in sculpture - Techniques: conventional practices and idiom - Visual and tactile phenomena: communication and response - From producing studies to modelling: positive and negative space - Addressing the elements of composition: line, shape and form, proportions, scale and size, tone and quantitative order, rhythm and variation, texture, colour - Additive and subtractive methods - Sculpture in the round / relief work: specific problems and differences - Exercises in various types of relief.

e-class:  ARCH233

L. Arachovitis, 3 hours

  • Photography in Archaeology(Winter semester)

The course examines the importance and the necessity of the archaeological photography that carries information and is part of the study, publication and promotion of monuments and finds. It analyzes the basic principles and techniques of photography in Archaeology.

G. Stathopoulos, 3 hours

  • Field Archaeology(Spring semester)

The course discusses the importance, the goals and the main directions of Field Archaeology, like surface survey, excavation, archaeometry and map reading.

G. Stathopoulos, 3 hours